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InfoSec, DevSec, Penetration Testing, etc.
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Nikita Popov news-web.php.net

PHP's git server was compromised (👋 GitHub)

Anyone on the inside know why they didn’t shift to GitHub years ago?

We don’t yet know how exactly this happened, but everything points towards a compromise of the git.php.net server (rather than a compromise of an individual git account).

While investigation is still underway, we have decided that maintaining our own git infrastructure is an unnecessary security risk, and that we will discontinue the git.php.net server. Instead, the repositories on GitHub, which were previously only mirrors, will become canonical.

The memo points to the two malicious commits.

The Changelog The Changelog #432

Big breaches (and how to avoid them)

This week we’re talking about big security breaches with Neil Daswani, renowned security expert, best-selling author, and Co-Director of Stanford University’s Advanced CyberSecurity Program. His book, Big Breaches: Cybersecurity Lessons for Everyone helped to guide this conversation. We cover the six common key causes (aka vectors) that lead to breaches, which of these causes are exploited most often, recent breaches such as the Equifax breach (2017), the Capital One breach (2019), and the more recent Solarwinds breach (2020).

Tooling github.com

The reverse engineer's toolkit

A pre-installed and pre-configured set of tools for folks interested in reverse engineering and/or malware analysis on Windows systems.

Obviously, you can download such tools from their own website and install them by yourself in a new VM. But if you download retoolkit, it can probably save you some time. Additionally, the tools come pre-configured so you’ll find things like x64dbg with a few plugins, command-line tools working from any directory, etc. You may like it if you’re setting up a new analysis VM.

Note they say “a new analysis VM”. Do NOT install this on anything but a virtual machine.

Security securitytxt.org

security.txt – a proposed standard for defining security policies

The main purpose of security.txt is to help make things easier for companies and security researchers when trying to secure platforms. Thanks to security.txt, security researchers can easily get in touch with companies about security issues.

It’s currently an Internet draft that has been submitted for RFC review, which means they’re taking contributions from the public. Seems like a good idea to me.

security.txt – a proposed standard for defining security policies

Google Icon Google

Google is funding rewrites of critical OSS projects in memory-safe languages

Dan Lorenc, from Google’s Infrastructure Security Team:

Software written in unsafe languages often contains hard-to-catch bugs that can result in severe security vulnerabilities, and we take these issues seriously at Google. That’s why we’re expanding our collaboration with the Internet Security Research Group to support the reimplementation of critical open-source software in memory-safe languages.

Notice he said “expanding our collaboration”, which must mean they’ve been doing this for a bit, but I wasn’t aware of the effort? An uplifting trend, regardless. Work is well underway:

The new Rust-based HTTP and TLS backends for curl and now this new TLS library for Apache httpd are an important starting point in this overall effort. These codebases sit at the gateway to the internet and their security is critical in the protection of data for millions of users worldwide.

Security securitylab.github.com

How to get root on Ubuntu 20.04 by pretending nobody’s /home

Kevin Backhouse:

I am a fan of Ubuntu, so I would like to help make it as secure as possible. I have recently spent quite a bit of time looking for security vulnerabilities in Ubuntu’s system services, and it has mostly been an exercise in frustration…

This blog post is about an astonishingly straightforward way to escalate privileges on Ubuntu. With a few simple commands in the terminal, and a few mouse clicks, a standard user can create an administrator account for themselves. I have made a short demo video, to show how easy it is.

This particular vulnerability is regarding the GUI, so your Ubuntu servers are unaffected. Still, 👀

Docker cloudberry.engineering

Dockerfile security best practices

8 common security issues when using Docker and how to avoid them. Here’s a sampler:

Avoid curl bashing

Pulling stuff from internet and piping it into a shell is as bad as it could be. Unfortunately it’s a widespread solution to streamline installations of software.

The risk is the same framed for supply chain attacks and it boils down to trust. If you really have to curl bash, do it right…

Josh Aas abetterinternet.org

Memory safe ‘curl’ for a more secure internet

We recently talked with Josh Aas on The Changelog #389 about securing the web with Let’s Encrypt. At the tail end of the conversation Josh shared his passion for memory safety, saying “we need to rewrite all the software that we already wrote in C and C++, and replace it. “ My guess is that this move with Daniel and curl takes us several steps further in this direction.

Memory safety vulnerabilities represent one of the biggest threats to Internet security. As such, we at ISRG are interested in finding ways to make the most heavily relied-upon software on the Internet memory safe. Today we’re excited to announce that we’re working with Daniel Stenberg, author of ubiquitous curl software, and WolfSSL, to make critical parts of the curl codebase memory safe. … ISRG is funding Daniel to work on adding support for Hyper as an HTTP back-end for curl. Hyper is a fast and safe HTTP implementation written in Rust.

Apple samcurry.net

We hacked Apple for 3 months: here’s what we found

Six white-hat hackers spent a few months on Apple’s bug bounty program:

There were a total of 55 vulnerabilities discovered with 11 critical severity, 29 high severity, 13 medium severity, and 2 low severity reports. These severities were assessed by us for summarization purposes and are dependent on a mix of CVSS and our understanding of the business related impact.

This is a report of their findings: how they did it, vulnerabilities found, and how Apple responded to each one.

Utku Sen utkusen.com

Security by obscurity is underrated

Utku Sen:

In the information security field, we have developed lots of thoughts that can’t be discussed (or rarely discussed):

  • Never roll your own crypto
  • Always use TLS
  • Security by obscurity is bad

I certainly learned these in my Infosec classes in college. Back then I didn’t really question it much, because what did I know? But I definitely remember thinking, “Okay security by obscurity is bad, but maybe why not do it anyway? Defense in depth, right?” Back to Utku:

Most of them are very generally correct. However, I started to think that people are telling those because everyone is telling them. And, most of the people are actually not thinking about exceptional cases. In this post, I will raise my objection against the idea of “Security by obscurity is bad”.

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