SQLite unixsheikh.com

SQLite is the only database you will ever need in most cases

SQLite is so hot right now.

Even if you start out small and later need to upscale, as long as your web application can run on the same machine as the database, which it can in 99% of the time, you can just upgrade the hardware to a beefier machine and keep business as usual.

The only time you need to consider a client-server setup is…

Marko Živanović markozivanovic.com

Screw it, I'll host it myself

Marko Zivanovic has had enough of letting other people own his data:

Owning your data is more than just having backup copies of your digital information. It’s also about control and privacy. It’s about trust. I don’t know about you, but I don’t trust a lot of services with my data (the ones I do are few and far between).

How does he replace all those hosted services?

I created a simple diagram to roughly show how my personal setup works. Before you say anything – I’m aware that there’s a group of people that wouldn’t consider my self-hosting as pure self-hosting. I’m using Vultr to host my web-facing applications and not a server in my house. Unfortunately, the current situation doesn’t allow me to do that (yet).

This all looks like a lot of work to pull off, but maybe it’s worth it?

Screw it, I'll host it myself

Teleport Icon Teleport – Sponsored

Securing your PostgreSQL database

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Databases are the Holy Grail for hackers, and as such, must be protected with utmost care. This is the first in a series of articles from Teleport where they give an overview of best practices for securing databases.

They’re starting with one of the most popular open-source databases, PostgreSQL, and will go over several levels of security you’d need to think about:

  • Network-level security
  • Transport-level security
  • Database-level security

Go Time Go Time #175

The ultimate guide to crafting your GopherCon proposal

The Call for Proposals for GopherCon 2021 is open from Monday, April 5th to Sunday, April 25th. Kris Brandow, an experienced GopherCon speaker, has published a series of guides to assist Gophers as they craft their proposals and think about submitting.

In this episode Kris reads through his guide, discussing the four parts with a GopherCon newbie, Angelica Hill, who spoke for the first time at GopherCon last year, and is a first time CFP reviewer this year.

AI (Artificial Intelligence) exxactcorp.com

Disentangling AI, machine learning, and deep learning

This article starts with a concise description of the relationship and differences of these 3 commonly used industry terms. Then it digs into the history.

Deep learning is a subset of machine learning, which in turn is a subset of artificial intelligence, but the origins of these names arose from an interesting history. In addition, there are fascinating technical characteristics that can differentiate deep learning from other types of machine learning…essential working knowledge for anyone with ML, DL, or AI in their skillset.

Disentangling AI, machine learning, and deep learning

CloudZero Icon CloudZero – Sponsored

10+ AWS cost management best practices

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While there are many advantages to using Amazon Web Services (AWS), cost management can be complicated because so many factors impact your AWS bill. Account setup, savings plans, and a number of other factors can all affect your AWS charges and usage.

In this article, we’ll introduce 10 AWS cost management best practices that promote optimization, and how you can go beyond AWS cost management by using an advanced cloud cost intelligence tool.

Casey Newton platformer.news

What really happened at Basecamp

Casey Newton interviewed a half-dozen Basecamp employees, as well as David Heinemeier Hansson (Basecamp co-founder) to write this account of recent events.

How a list of “funny” customer names triggered an internal reckoning. The controversy that embroiled enterprise software maker Basecamp this week began more than a decade ago, with a simple list of customers. Around 2009, Basecamp customer service representatives began keeping a list of names that they found funny. More than a decade later, current employees were so mortified by the practice that none of them would give me a single example of a name on the list.

Discussion about the list and how the company ought to hold itself accountable for creating it led directly to CEO Jason Fried announcing Tuesday that Basecamp would ban employees from holding “societal and political discussions” on the company’s internal chat forums. The move, which has sparked widespread discussion in Silicon Valley, follows a similar move from cryptocurrency company Coinbase last year.

Employees say the founders’ memos unfairly depicted their workplace as being riven by partisan politics, when in fact the main source of the discussion had always been Basecamp itself.

Seriously loving the writing coming from Casey on Platformer since his departure from The Verge.

Stack Overflow stackoverflow.blog

How often do people actually copy/paste from Stack Overflow? Now we know

April Fool’s may be over, but once we set up a system to react every time someone typed Command+C, we realized there was also an opportunity to learn about how people use our site. Here’s what we found.

TLDR; one in four users copy something within five minutes of hitting a page. But this blog post (and accompanying podcast episode) goes deep into the details and lays it all out for you with pretty charts.

Windows github.com

WSLg brings Linux GUI apps to Windows in a fully integrated fashion

WSLg provides an integrated experience for developers, scientists or enthusiasts that prefer or need to run Windows on their PC but also need the ability to run tools or applications which works best, or exclusively, in a Linux environment. While users can accomplish this today using a multiple system setup, with individual PC dedicated to Windows and Linux, virtual machine hosting either Windows or Linux, or an XServer running on Windows and projected into WSL, WSLg provides a more integrated, user friendly and productive alternative.

WSLg strives to make Linux GUI applications feel native and natural to use on Windows. From integration into the Start Menu for launch to appearing in the task bar, alt-tab experience to enabling cut/paste across Windows and Linux applications, WSLg enables a seamless desktop experience and workflow leveraging Windows and Linux applications.

Microsoft’s engineers just keep crankin’ out the hits.

WSLg brings Linux GUI apps to Windows in a fully integrated fashion

Jonas Lundberg iamjonas.me

The test-plan

The tests are timing out again!”, someone yells. “Alright I’ll bump them”, you instinctively respond. Then you pause and feel uneasy. Is there another way?

In this blog post, I share my growing disconnect with code-coverage and unit-testing. I then detail the method I’ve been using for the greater part of 7 years and how it still allows me to preach at length that being correct is the single most important thing for a developer.

 Vanessa Sochat cacm.acm.org

10 best practices for remote software engineering

What does “developer productivity” mean to you?

At face value, when we think of developer productivity we might think of effectiveness in time management, communication, and task completion. Although we are drawn to personal workflow or time management tools, and learning secrets to improving our productivity, ironically this quest for the holy grail can sometimes take us off course and be a detriment to our productivity. … As a developer of scientific software, and one who has transitioned to working remotely before any stay at home orders, I have slowly learned to optimize my own productivity by focusing exclusively on well-being.

Thanks to Vanessa for summarizing what she’s learned. Here’s a sample…

Establish routine and environment. Small details about your working environment, or lack of a routine, can hugely throw off your workday, and thus your productivity. You should generally pay attention to the lighting, noise level, and comfort of a work space. If you find yourself distracted by anything, you might consider changing your environment.

This will likely pair well with JS Party #169: Work environments & happiness

Brett Cannon snarky.ca

The social contract of open source

Brett Cannon, who is a Python core developer (and a tall, snarky Canadian):

I felt it was time to do another blog post to directly address the issue of entitlement by some open source users which is hurting open source, both for themselves and for others. I want to get the point across that open source maintainers owe you quite literally nothing when it comes to their open source code, and treating them poorly is unethical. And to me, this is the underlying social contract of open source. (emphasis added)

You should read the entire post, especially if you want to learn which programming language (having nothing to do with snakes) that has Brett’s attention. But I’d be remiss not to pull quote this gift of a pull quote from the end:

Every commit of open source code should be viewed as an independent gift from the maintainer that they happened to leave on their front yard for others to enjoy if they so desire; treating them as a means to and for their open source code is unethical.

Tim O'Reilly oreilly.com

The end of Silicon Valley as we know it?

High-profile entrepreneurs like Elon Musk, venture capitalists like Peter Thiel and Keith Rabois, and big companies like Oracle and HP Enterprise are all leaving California. During COVID-19, Zoom-enabled tech workers have discovered the benefits of remote work from cheaper, less congested communities elsewhere. Is this the end of Silicon Valley as we know it? Perhaps. But other challenges to Silicon Valley’s preeminence are more fundamental than the tech diaspora.

Understanding four trends that may shape the future of Silicon Valley is also a road map to some of the biggest technology-enabled opportunities of the next decades…

There are most posts like this from Tim.

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